Posts made in August, 2016

Many Trucking Companies are Guilty of Violating Federal Rules Governing Trucks

Posted by on Aug 11, 2016 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

There are about two million registered semi-trailers operating on and sharing roads and highways with smaller vehicles. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, close to half a million of these trucks get involved accidents every year, accidents that result to about 130,000 injuries and 5,000 deaths.

Despite these huge numbers in accidents, injuries and deaths, semi-trailers, also called big rigs or 18-wheelers, cannot be taken off the road due to their major contribution in the nation’s economy. This does not stop the federal government, though, from passing and strictly implementing laws that are hoped to make roads safer and minimize the number of truck accidents. The federal government agencies which make and enforce laws include the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA).

Two of the very important laws passed by these agencies are the rule on the Hours of Service and the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986.

The Hours of Service (HOS) mandate, which was issued by the FMCSA, governs the working hours of those operating a commercial motor vehicle. HOS sets the maximum number of daily and weekly hours that a truck driver can spend driving; it also determines how long a driver should rest between driving shifts. This mandates aims to make sure that no driver of semi-trailer is feeling fatigued or sleepy whenever they hit the road. To track the number of hours a driver spends on the road, he or she could use either an ordinary log book or an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR).

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986, which establishes uniform testing and licensing standards for operators of commercial motor vehicles. Due to the enormous size and weight of semi- trailers, the government strictly requires that drivers possess the necessary knowledge and skills in the safe operation of these vehicles. Thus, before being issued a commercial driver’s license, a person will first need to undergo special training and pass a series of tests.

As explained in the website of Crowe & Mulvey, LLP, some trucking companies make oversights regarding safety through violation of the hours of service rule, negligent hiring, failure to Employer Negligence train drivers, and failure to inspect vehicles. These oversights can constitute negligence which is the major basis, for whoever may be injured in an accident involving trucks, for filing a civil lawsuit.

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